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The Imagined Nebula series demonstrates the inability to accurately describe the vastness of something, which is so difficult to even perceive never mind portray or understand, especially when we are such a fundamental part of those systems.

 

“For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.” Carl Sagan

 

Creating the objects within the paintings using different textures so they have no definitive edge that can be perfectly measured showing that however much we think we know or

how ever close to those all important answers, we’re always just that invisible line away. Questioning if we can ever be fully objective to such a subjective thing?

 

“Some part of our being knows this is where we came from. We long to return, and we can, because the cosmos is also within us. We're made of star stuff. We are a way for the cosmos to know itself.” Carl Sagan

 

The work also touches on the Macro and Micro aspects of the universe that these huge clouds of gas and dust are made of the same elements that make up us and everything around us and even the geometric structures of these elements can be found in both huge unfathomable colossal bodies as well as the tiniest microscopic particles and forces that hold everything together. And who is to say these Nebula don’t exist somewhere in the infinite expanse of the universe.

Imagined Nebula

Loz Atkinson, Imagined Nebula, Masonry Paint, Acry

A digital file of the above Imagined Nebula is hurtling its ways through space as part of NASA's OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission to the asteriod Bennu, a carbonaceous asteroid whose regolith may record the earliest history of our solar system. Bennu may contain the molecular precursors to the origin of life and the Earth’s oceans. Bennu is also one of the most potentially hazardous asteroids, as it has a relatively high probability of impacting the Earth late in the 22nd century.

 

OSIRIS-REx will determine Bennu’s physical and chemical properties, which will be critical to know in the event of an impact mitigation mission. As part of the mission works of art will be saved on a chip on the spacecraft. “Space exploration is an inherently creative activity,” said Dante Lauretta, principal investigator for OSIRIS-REx at the University of Arizona, Tucson. “We are inviting the world to join us on this great adventure by placing their art work on the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, where it will stay in space for millennia.”

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